Skip to main content
background
IKEA HIGHLIGHTS 2016
POWERED BY PEOPLE
header
WRITER: DANIEL DASEY
bikebackgroundbike box
Designed to replace cars on short trips – and to be fun to ride – the SLADDA bike is part of IKEA’s commitment to building a brighter, more sustainable future for the many.

Tables, chairs, bookshelves, kitchens – and one very special bike. When IKEA announced it was adding the SLADDA bicycle to its range in 2016, more than a few eyebrows were raised around the world. What was a furniture and homewares business doing dabbling with two-wheeled transport?


BUT DESIGNER OSKAR JUHLIN, who helped create SLADDA together with IKEA deisgners Sarah Fager and Marcus Arvonen, says the bike is actually a natural extension of the IKEA commitment to making life better for the many. “IKEA has a focus on sustainable products in the home,” he says. “SLADDA is about doing something from a sustainability perspective outside the home, and replacing cars on some journeys.”


At first glance, it’s clear that SLADDA is far from your average bicycle. Chains and derailleurs have been replaced with a rust- and oil-free belt drive and automatic gears. An easy-click knob system makes it simple to add and remove accessories such as front and rear racks. SLADDA also has a multi-gender aluminium frame and clever handlebars that adjust for relaxed and streamlined postures.
There’s room to do so much more and for people to even hack their own SLADDA accessories.
quatebikebikebikewheel
JUHLIN, WHO CREATED SLADDA in collaboration with colleagues from the Veryday design studio and the IKEA design team says the vision for SLADDA was to create a beautiful, affordable and well-made bike that was suitable for commuting, making trips to the shops, and taking kids to kindergarten. “We wanted to put functionality back on the map through things like a good basket system, a frame configuration that made it possible to carry loads, and a relatively low step-in height so that you can have a child seat there.”

Juhlin is particularly proud of SLADDA’s steel knob-attachment system, which allows the basket and other accessories to be removed and tidily stored when not in use. “And this is just the starting point,” he says. “There’s room to do so much more and for people to even hack their own SLADDA accessories.”
Get ready for an interesting ride!
MEET BILLY AT HIS
COUNTRYSIDE BIRTHPLACE
He has been around for nearly four decades. Most of us have either lived with him or gotten to know him at a friend’s place. Come along and meet BILLY at his countryside birthplace where about 4.5 million BILLY bookcases see daylight each year.
Get the full story about the BILLY production
PROTECTING DESKS
… AND THE PLANET
Why not take recycling one step further and actually make new products out of waste? A few years back, someone at IKEA had this ‘crazy idea’… But now, this is turning into reality, saving money for the customers and finite resources for Mother Earth.
Learn more about the crazy idea
PEEKING INTO THE WORLD’S
LARGEST PRINT PRODUCTION
Translated into 33 languages, in 48 different markets, reaching about 255 million people, this year’s IKEA Catalogue welcomed everyone to be themselves. The statement was clear: IKEA doesn’t design furniture for consumers - they design for people. And the reality? People are human, and humans are not perfect.
Get a peek behind the scenes
FURNITURE MADE OUT OF PAPER. NO, SERIOUSLY!
Sofas and chairs made from the same stuff as egg cartons? And bench tops and table legs made from bamboo? Anything is possible as IKEA design-teams explore a world of materials.
Learn more about new materials
2
IKEA HIGHLIGHTS
Many companies, organisations and people, together, shape IKEA. Each and every person, idea and solution contribute to the big picture. IKEA Highlights collects stories from different parts of the IKEA world to describe this year’s accomplishments, quirks and maybe even a few slips. Good thing we’re all human.
016
A FORCE FOR GOOD DESIGN
A long, long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, David Wahl was given a mission. A young IKEA designer, David was asked to produce a unique object that could defeat the darkness in homes across the planet, bringing light and hope to the many. The result was the IKEA PS Pendant lamp: a planet-like lighting fixture that ‘explodes’ at the pull of a string, spilling warm, glorious light across surrounding spaces.
Read the full story about the IKEA PS Pendant lamp
MOST THINGS STILL
REMAIN TO BE DONE
Have you ever wondered where IKEA came from? Or how a simple country boy from Småland was inspired to create one of the world’s leading brands and help create a better everyday life for millions of people?
Find the answers in the full story